MS32-P21 Molecules for electronics: Understanding their intramolecular properties towards their incorporation in devices Berta Gómez-Lor (New Architectures in Materials Science, ICMM, CSIC, Madrid, Spain) Angela Benito (New Architectures in Materials Science, ICMM, CSIC, Madrid, Spain) Constanza Ruiz (New Architectures in Materials Science, ICMM, CSIC, Madrid, Spain) Marcelo Echeverri (New Architectures in Materials Science, ICMM, CSIC, Madrid, Spain)email: bgl@icmm.csic.es
In recent years, the field of organic electronics has suffered enormous progresses. In fact, this area has evolved in only a few years from basic research to the development of devices such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), organic photovoltaics (OPVs) and organic field effect transistor (OFETs) which are already reaching the market. The soft character of organic materials allows their solution processing and renders them very attractive in the development of flexible, light weight and low cost devices.
At the molecular level, fundamental parameters towards the incorporation of molecular materials in (opto)electronic devices -such as , light emission or absorption, energy levels…- can be designed “a la carte” thanks to the deep knowledge that has been acquired in the last few years through numerous structure-properties studies. However, properties of molecular materials are governed not only by those of individual molecules but also by the way they are spatially ordered. Single crystal analysis provides invaluable information on how molecules are arranged with respect to their surroundings and on the nature of intermolecular interactions among neighboring units in the bulk materials.
In this context we present here different examples of organic materials with light emitting and/or charge transport properties  recently developed in our research group and show how a good  understanding their intramolecular interactions (achieved through single crystal X-ray analysis) has allowed us to optimize their  final properties.
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Keywords: organic materials, charge transport, light emission