MS18-P06 1-Dimensional sp3-Carbon Nanostructures Synthesized through Nanocasting at High Pressure Damian Paliwoda (Department of Chemistry, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA, United States of America) Maria Baldini (Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, DC, United States of America) Venkata S. Bhadram (Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, DC, United States of America) Shah Najiba (Department of Chemistry, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA, United States of America) Timothy A. Strobel (Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, DC, United States of America) Kai Landskron (Department of Chemistry, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA, United States of America)email: dap216@lehigh.eduOne-dimensional diamond mesostructures (1D-diamond) are of interest as heat-conducting wires, and as mechanically reinforcing material in diamond/polymer composites because of the superlative mechanical strength and thermal conductivity of diamond. Thus far, 1D-diamond has been produced by CVD methods.1 However, CVD methods do not allow for the economic production of bulk quantities of 1D-diamond, and it is difficult to control the diameters and length of the produced 1D-diamond structures. Currently there is no high-pressure synthesis available for the bulk synthesis of one-dimensional diamond mesostructures. The basic problem is that at high-pressure conditions it is difficult to direct the growth of diamond crystals in a specific direction. In addition, any one-dimensional structure formed can easily aggregate with another which prevents any further processing after the high-pressure synthesis.2
Herein, we present the synthesis of diamond-like 1D sp3-carbon mesostructures from benzene inside the 1-dimensional channels of periodic mesoporous silica SBA-15 at pressures above 20 GPa and room temperature (Figure 1). Inside the silica template, the 1D-sp3-carbon nanostructures are spatially separated from each other preventing their aggregation at the high-pressure conditions. Small Angle and X-Ray Scattering data collected for SBA-15/benzene composite clearly shows that silica mesostructure retains its periodic order upon compression, while X-ray diffraction experiments allow to track pressure-induced structural transformations of benzene.

Acknowledgements: This work was supported by the EFree, an Energy Frontier Research Center of the US Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Science (SC-0001057).
 
References:

[1] Schwander, M., Partes, K. (2011) Diamond and Rel. Mater. 20, 1287-1301.

[2] Yu, Y., Wu, L., Zhi, J. (2014) Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 53, 2-28.
Keywords: one-dimensional nanomaterials, high pressure, diamond anvil cell